Financial Instability

Financial Instability – Debt, Depression, and Suicide

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2 comments

This blog post is part of the Suicide Prevention Awareness Month blog tour in partnership with Debt Drop. If you are feeling suicidal, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text HOME to 741741.

People who are struggling with debt are more likely to suffer from depression and consider suicide than those who don’t have debt. Over 40,000 people die from suicide each year in the United States.

Debt does not define you.

I’ve always had a tricky relationship with money. As a kid, I knew my family struggled to pay our bills. One day my parents told me we were moving. A couple days later we were out of our house and in a rental, no typical house hunt and no packing up all my things. Foreclosure, with no foresight for the teenager.

After losing most of my childhood belongings I realized how precarious finances can be. And the stress of financial instability radiated through our home.

I began to struggle with depression, and didn’t know where I fit. I didn’t feel a sense of belonging in my middle class community and carried a secret not to be shared with friends. My relationships struggled and my mind flashed to scary places. Fortunately, I never made the choice to end it all.

Over time, the depression faded. Now, most days are great. It takes time, but life does get better, even wonderful. I’ve learned about money and my financial outlook has improved.

Debt can be overcome.

While debt may last many years, even decades, it is not who you are. People are worth so much more than the money in their bank account.

If you are struggling with debt and depression, or contemplating suicide, there is help:

If you know someone struggling with suicide:

  • Listen, with an open heart and with no judgement
  • Consult online resources: National Institutes of Health
  • Support research and organizations working to end suicide and support mental health treatment
  • Be open about your own struggles, the world is not as perfect as social media may portray
  • Get training to better understand and help others in need
  • Recognize that you may need help too, find a different person to be your support

Resources

Thank you to Dear Debt for organizing and leading this Suicide Prevention Awareness Month Blog Tour.

 

This blog post is part of the Suicide Prevention Awareness Month blog tour in partnership with Debt Drop. If you are feeling suicidal, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text HOME to 741741.

 

2 comments on “Financial Instability – Debt, Depression, and Suicide”

    • Susan
    • 2017-10-06
    Reply

    Great post! I’m a new reader, and I look forward to reading your blog. This post brings up some dark memories and feelings for me too. Even when the debt is paid and everything is settled for the best, it’s hard to shake the fear. It sticks, at least in my case.

    1. Reply

      Thank you so much for your feedback. It sticks for me too, and it’s good to know I’m not alone.

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